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Shrinking Vessel Team Building and 6 Other Great Exercises

shrinking vessel team building

Seeking team building exercises workplace fun begin here!

Move beyond the ordinary routine that can stem from a stagnant workplace. Team building exercises workplace can add energy and change the pace to give you a fresh outlook.  This outlook might be what you need to make work interesting again.

Bonding Belt

Form two or more teams.  You will then tie a string around each group forming the bonding belt.  The job of the team is to move from point A to point B.  As the group leader, you are responsible for timing them as they work together to move from area to area.  You can increase the challenge by making them move blindfolded.  Alternatively, you can introduce hazards or land mines that they must navigate around to make the route more difficult.

Concentration

Divide the group in half with one person standing across from another forming a line.  Each person should take mental note of the physical attributes of the individual standing across from him or her.  One side will start.  Their job is to exchange physical attributes with the people in their line or alter items in a way so that they appear different.  The half of the group will keep their eyes shut or leave the room as to allow the person to make changes.  After an allotted time, say 30 seconds, they will open their eyes or reenter the room.  The person must identify the ten attributes that the other person changed.  You will then switch tasks allowing the other person an opportunity to make alterations.

Impromptu Skit

As a team leader, you will gather an array of items available in the workplace.  You will then break the larger group into smaller teams.  These smaller teams will be responsible for developing a skit using the available prompts.  If you desire, you could provide a bit of guidance by stating the scope of the skit pertain to work or a problem they are facing.  Providing this direction may prove beneficial as it leads to large group discussions.

Shrinking Vessel Team Building

Using string, you can create boundaries.  Group members are asked to stay within the confines of these boundaries.  Slowly, you will shrink the boundary, forcing members to respond creatively to stay within this fenced in area.

Frostbite

Provide groups with an assortment of construction materials like toothpicks or Popsicle sticks.  Give the groups 15 minutes to assemble a shelter to protect them from the elements.  The catch is that one person from each group has frostbite on their hands.  Due to this frostbite, they are unable to participate in the assembly process but are allowed to speak.  The rest of the team suffers from snow blindness and must keep their eyes covered during assembly.  When time runs out, they will leave their shelter alone.  You will then test their construction prowess by turning on an electric fan aimed directly at their shelter.  This test will determine if the group survives.

Spider Web

Have all team members assemble within a room.  You will then place two strings that stretch across the doorway.  The team is tasked to get out of the room with as many survivors as possible.  If an individual happens to touch the string, they do not survive.  This task can be made more difficult with the addition of additional strength.

Local Community Event

Take advantage of the uniqueness of your community.  Each community has a unique capability like paintballing, mini golf, Frisbee golf, or go carts.  You can also go to a park and have a picnic.  There are also community sightseeing attractions that you can visit.  Often locals do visit the sites and fail to take advantage of this unique attraction.

The next time they have a team building exercises, workplace setting can be a happier place so embrace the opportunity.

About the Author David

David Moriarty writes about leadership, life purpose, and cancer recovery. He is a teacher who works with youth. Previously he overcame his battle with cancer. Currently he is pursuing a degree in leadership.

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